What’s New?: The Newbery

Every year around this time we start rolling out red carpets and handing out award trophies. We dole out accolades with adoration and commendation, both genuine and feigned. We watch with rapt attention to see who is wearing the best dress. And the worst. We throw themed parties and make bets with friends regarding the outcome of various award ceremonies. We indulge ourselves in the notion that watching and reading and discussing these events actually makes us a part of them.

But not all awards this season exist purely for the recognition of the silver screen. Every year around this time, the American Library Association (ALA) lends its seal of approval to the most notable children’s books of the year. In between the excitement that was the Golden Globes and the anticipation leading up to the Oscars, the ALA inserts its voice into mainstream media culture to remind us all that there is still something to be said about literature for children. That it is indeed important for us to remember and recognize the authors and illustrators who continually produce fodder for growing imaginations.

Yesterday, the winners of the prestigious awards were announced. There was no red carpet. There were no camera crews or flash photographers. There were no E! programs devoted to them. No trophies. The winning books have nothing more than a small foil seal on their covers. But that seal is proof that the tradition of recognition and acclaim is still alive and well in both the publishing world and in the world of children’s literature.

Since 1922, the ALA has been awarding the Newbery Medal to an outstanding work of literature for children written by an American author, published in an American publishing house in English. It became the first official award for children’s literature in the world, and each winner carries the heft of that prestige. Despite the growth of technology, children’s literature has come into its own as a genre worthy of recognition and study. Since the inception of the Newbery award, the evolution of Literature in general (particularly children’s literature) has created the need for various other awards, marking the journey of American culture and the culture of childhood.

For more information about the ALA and other children’s literature awards, click here. For more information about this year’s Newbery winner, stay tuned for this week’s Novel Thoughts post.

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